The Monitoring Trans- and Homophobic Violence in Berlin project aims to improve the recording and documentation of trans- and homophobic violence, in order to raise awareness in urban society and empower victims. The first edition of the report, published in December 2020, is the start of continuous update-based reporting with two main focuses:

With the help of the Berlin Monitor, both focuses are supplemented by a representative look at trans- and homophobic attitudes and experiences of discrimination as well as by three guest contributions – including on the concept of ‘hate crime’ and the overlap between sexism, misogyny and anti-lesbian violence. A summary of the key findings for both main focuses is provided here first.

Trans- and homophobic violence in police statistics
Trans- and homophobic attitudes and experiences of discrimination in Berlin
The focus on anti-lesbian violence: understanding anti-lesbian violence
The focus on anti-lesbian violence: findings from the standardised survey

Trans- and homophobic violence in police statistics

A particularly high number of cases of trans- and homophobic violence are reported in Berlin.

The statistics for hate crime against sexual orientation and/or sexual identity document male* injured parties in particular. A substantial proportion of the cases are violent acts with insults the most frequent offence.
Hate crime against sexual orientation and/or sexual identity is more broadly anchored in society and is only attributable to a politically organised spectrum to a lesser extent.
The geographical focus is on Mitte, Tempelhof-Schöneberg and Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg.
Trans- and homophobic offences documented by the police are often related to going-out behaviour.
The suspects are predominantly male and often already known to the police. Their nationalities correspond largely with Berlin’s population structure.
The injured parties in police-documented trans- and homophobic violence are mostly out alone, don’t know the perpetrator and are young.
Violent crimes are resolved less often than non-violent crimes.
Trans- and homophobic attitudes and experiences of discrimination in Berlin
The focus on anti-lesbian violence: understanding anti-lesbian violence
Lesbians tend to be invisible in statistics on homophobia.
Anti-lesbian violence is an urgent topic for lesbian/queer women*.
Violence occurs mostly in public space but assaults in a person’s personal surroundings are often felt to be more stressful.
Overlaps with other forms of discrimination are a major factor.
Many lesbian/queer women* take precautionary measures. In experiencing violent situations, the behaviour of bystanders is an important factor.
The focus on anti-lesbian violence: findings from the standardised survey
Who was surveyed?
The majority of respondents have experienced anti-lesbian violence in the past five years. The overlap with sexism is a major factor in these incidents.
The vast majority of respondents take precautionary measures, but assaults are only rarely reported to the police.
Bystanders are often present but they rarely intervene.
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